Clichés are dangerous things.

“Less is more.”

“There’s a reason for everything.”

"One day at a time."

Everyone has their favorite.

What makes clichés so dangerous isn’t that they aren’t true. In fact, most times clichés are dangerous precisely because they are true... painfully.

No, the real danger arises because despite their truth (or maybe even because of it), they’re incredibly hard to apply. Clichés are truisms that rarely serve well as practical advice.

Moving into 2013, the reigning Internet champ is clear: “Content is king.”

Moving into 2013, the reigning Internet champ is clear: “Content is king.”

In fact, “Content is king” is so cliché that it’s even becoming cliché to say it’s cliché. One prominent marketing blog recently went so far as to predict imminent onset of articles hailing the “death of content marketing” as soon as early this year.

Still (as that blog itself points out) like any good cliché, saying “it’s cliché” doesn’t make it any less true... or any more helpful.

MarketingSherp’s “B2B marketing 2012" year-in-review summarized the current "state of B2B marketing” well:

“One topic stands out above the rest — content marketing. Even case studies that focused on other channels, such as email marketing, often had a content marketing strategy at the heart of the effort.”

The question for 2013 isn’t so much should you start producing content, but how? The answer: start a blog.

The question for 2013 isn’t so much should you start producing content, but how? The answer: start a blog.

Sound trite? It should. But (and you probably saw this coming) that doesn’t mean it isn't true.

In an article published earlier this year—Why Every Business Should Have a Blog—Kristi Hines posed the question, “Should Your Business Have a Blog?” Her answer was anything but ambiguous:

”First off, you may be thinking that your business doesn’t need a blog. Here are [three] easy questions to ask yourself when deciding whether your business needs to be blogging.

1. Does your business have customers or potential customers?

2. Are your customers or potential customers online?

3. Do your customers or potential customers read online publications?”

If you answered yes to the above questions, then you can answer yes to whether your business needs a blog. We certainly were able to say yes to all of them, and so here we are, getting about the business of creating good relevant content.

...so here we are, getting about the business of creating good relevant content.

We will be sharing our insights, learnings and exploration on things relevant to us, our peers, customers and potential customers. In the meantime, remember...

It's not whether you win or lose that counts. It's how you play the game.

Or something like that.